Photo by Jason Beverly

Photo by Jason Beverly

Alan Barnosky, guitar. Originally from Detroit, MI, Alan has been a guitarist and and a bluegrass music fan since he was a teenager and has played with a number of groups since then, including the 2012 Telluride Band Competition runner-up Wayward Roots. He now lives in Durham, NC where he is a performing musician and hosts the weekly Beer & Banjos roots music series. His first solo record, Old Freight, was released in 2018 with the help of Counterclockwise mandolinist Robert Thornhill.

Photo by Kate Pope @KatePopePhoto

Photo by Kate Pope @KatePopePhoto

Michael Malek, banjo. Hailing from Winneconne, WI, Michael has been playing bluegrass for a decade, and more recently was inspired to pick up the banjo for its great bluegrass Appalachian melodies. He was initially drawn to bluegrass after listening to contemporary acoustic jam bands, but was then driven to go backwards in time to uncover the multitude of bands and genres of bluegrass. He has played in numerous bands in Idaho and Wisconsin before relocating to North Carolina and joining the ranks of Counterclockwise.

Photo by Jason Beverly

Photo by Jason Beverly

Palmyra Romeo, bass. Palmyra was introduced to the rich musical history of the South upon moving to Carrboro in middle school. Her interest in folk and bluegrass music grew as a teenager, listening to friends play around campfires and attending local music festivals like the Shakori Hills Grassroots Festival. She grew up playing piano and singing in the choir at school, and started playing bluegrass bass as an adult so she could join in on the jams. "There is a common language in bluegrass that brings together people from many backgrounds and generations, I love the musical connection and community that it creates."

Photo by Kate Pope @KatePopePhoto

Photo by Kate Pope @KatePopePhoto

Robert Thornhill, mandolin. Raised in Alabama, mandolinist Robert had to move to NC to learn bluegrass. “Having started in classical music, I am still mesmerized by Bach’s violin partitas,” Robert explains.  “But, you know, bluegrass has this irresistible charm.  And to my delight, I've discovered that Bach and bluegrass have lots in common: the same 12-note scale system, aggressive backbeat chops, the initial letter ‘B'….”  An adept self-interviewer, Robert now resides in Durham, NC, where he hopes to found the new "Bachgrass" genre.